WSD Bilingual Program

The WSD Bilingual Program offers instruction in both Cree and Ojibwe language.  Our programs are located at Isaac Brock School and currently run from grades K-1 for the 2017-2018 year, and will run from grades K-2 for the 2018-2019 school year.  For more information and registration contact Isaac Brock school or one of the Aboriginal Education Consultants.

Link to Bilingual program information – https://www.winnipegsd.ca/schools/IsaacBrock/AcademicsAndClasses/creeojibwe/Pages/Default.aspx

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/winnipeg-school-makes-history-1.3743804

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/wsd-cree-ojibwa-bilingual-open-house-1.3421483

Special Language Exams – High School Credit

Special Language Exams are hosted by Winnipeg School Division 2 times a year.  WSD can provide tutors to prepare students to challenge exams in Ojibwe, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dene, and Michif.  Students may earn up  to 4 special language credits towards graduation.  If you are aware of students that would like to challenge the exam, please contact the Aboriginal Education Consultants.  The next examination dates are in April 2019, students must register early, stay tuned for more information and registration forms.

Link to MB Ed Special Language Website – http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/languages/langcredit.html

Winnipeg School Division Language Classes

WSD will offer 2 sessions of Cree and Ojibwe language classes for staff, students, and community members.  Watch for informational posters, and emails to register on employee connect or email Rina Whitford at rwhitford@wsd1.org

Fall 2018 Session:

6 Weeks – November 7 – December 12

Time: 4:30 – 6:30

Location: Children of the Earth High School

Instructors:  Russell Maytwayashing & Rudy Okemaw

Spring 2019 Session:

Dates TBA

Stay tuned for updates, poster, and registration on employee connect.

Indigenous Languages Resources

For resources applicable to Indigenous Languages, the Manitoba Aboriginal Languages Strategy has developed a database of resources both in and about Indigenous languages.  Go to the Manitoba Curriculum Support Centre at http://mbcsc.edu.gov.mb.ca/ and search “mals”.  You can then narrow your search.  We invite you to search for these resources internally as well using the WSD Library Support Services at http://www1.youseemore.com/wsd1/default.asp and have them couriered to your school.  If WSD is missing a resource, please contact one of the Aboriginal Education Consultants: Bobbie-Jo Leclaire boleclaire@wsd1.org or Rina Bright rbriight@wsd1.org

Link to Manitoba Curriculum Support Centre http://mbcsc.edu.gov.mb.ca/

Link to WSD Library Support Services http://www1.youseemore.com/wsd1/default.asp

 

National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation is located at University of Manitoba.  The website has links to various resources and information.  Various projects for educators around Residential Schools and Reconciliation are under the “education” tab on their website.  The Project of Heart is one recommended activity that can be adapted for all grade levels.

Click the image above to find all the trc documents and final report.  Here is the 94 Calls to Action Document:

(300KB) Calls_to_Action_English2-1-rvxbbb

Reserve 107 – Reconciliation on the Prairies

Reserve 107 includes a documentary with study guides and additional resources included on the website.

ABOUT THE DOCUMENTARY RESERVE 107

For decades, stories have spread throughout the village of Laird, Saskatchewan. It has been said that First Nation descendants of an old treaty have visited shopkeepers and town officials. The First Nations that came to the town, starting in the 1970s, insisted that a treaty signed between their people and the government of Canada states the land of the locals actually belong to an Indigenous First Nation. But when a group of Mennonites and Lutherans in the town of Laird discover that the land they live on is in fact the former reserve of the Young Chippewayan First Nation, they are forced to acknowledge the history that has brought them to their present confrontation. A chief and descendant of the Young Chippewayan Band decide to invite the local community to a meeting at the central site of the former reserve as members in the town remain on edge. But an inevitable encounter at the towns historic site compels the characters into a surprising discovery. Myths, assumptions and fears are shattered as this old injustice is about to provide an opportunity for friendship and renew a fierce determination to repair the wrongs of the past.